Schools (Glenbeigh N.S. Folklore Project)

  • There were six schools in the parish – Glenbeigh, Curraheen and Leitir, Bunglash, Bohesill and Shanacashel. Three were in Glenbeigh and three were in Glencar.
  • They walked to school barefoot in the summer and wore boots in the winter.
  • In the old Glenbeigh N.S. there were three rooms. Junior infants, senior infants, first and second classes were taught by Miss O’ Farrell. 3rd, 4th, 5th & 6th Class were taught by Mr. J O’Doherty.
  • There also was a 7th class for children who did not pass their confirmation exam.
  • Boys and girls were not allowed to mix in the playground.
  • Games they played were skipping, football, hunts and Queenie-I-O
  • They had a school band and played drums and tinwhistles.
  • Subjects were Irish, English, Sums, Religion, Tables and Spellings.
  • They covered their books with brown paper.
  • They started preparing for their confirmation 3 months beforehand.
  • Fr. Griffin and Fr. McAuliffe called religion questions.
  • If you answered their questions correctly in school you got a ticket to go to the Church.
  • You were asked more questions. If you answered correctly you were confirmed.
  • After being confirmed their treat was to get an ice cream from Tom Evans of the Towers Hotel.
  • Most people traveled to church in pony and cart.
  • In the winter they made cocoa in school in big black pots. They got water from the river to make the cocoa and to wash the pots.
  • The children took turns in helping the teachers make the cocoa. Each child brought their own mug to school and it was left on the shelf until the holiday sand then brought home.
  • The girls buttered the bread. John O’Donnell left the bread on the school wall and sometimes the crows discovered the bread.
  • The bread was put into a big bath and each child got 2 slices.
  • In the late 1960’s we got soup in the winter.
  •  Children brought their own milk and bread during the summer.
  • Summer holidays were much shorter
  • When they went into school in the morning they said their name in Irish and they were marked present.
  • They wore no uniforms and girls wore no trousers.
  • Heating in the school was provided by the children. Each child brought a sod of turf to school every day during the winter or they were sent across the old railway to pick sticks.
  • There were no clocks in the school but the children knew it was nearly SOS time when the 10:15 train passed.
  • Their football pitch was where Glenbeigh N.S. is today.
  • To do their written work, in school, each child had a small blackboard, so it spared their own copies.
  • If you wrote in your copy you used an ink pen which you dipped into the ink well in your desk.
  • If too much ink was used, you used blotting paper to remove the extra ink.
  • Each child had their own ink pen and nib.
  • The inkwells were filled each morning with ink.
  • If you wrote with your left hand you got a slap. It hurt so much you tried to write with your right hand.
  • Curraheen School had two teachers Mrs. Booth and Mrs. O’Connor.
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